Chronicles of Tombstone's TurbulEnt Years

Tombstone History Archives

Letters Between John Clum, Fred Dodge & Stuart Lake

 

Transcribed by Eric Hewitt

 

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December 12, 1928

 

Mr. Stuart N. Lake

#3616 Portala Place,

San Diego, California

 

How is the work on the good book progressing? Is there anything further I can do to aid and abet? If so please advise me.

 

Wyatt is still here. I visit him often. He has been hoping to leave for the desert, but has not been strong enough to venture on the trip. Confidentially, I fear his condition is serious - but his constitution and nerve may enable him to hold out for a long time. I sincerely hope he may live to read the book you are preparing.

 

Very truly yours,

John P. Clum

 

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January 7, 1929

Mr. Stuart N. Lake

San Diego, Cal.

 

Dear Mr. Lake:

There has been some delay in making reply to your inquiry of December 14th, but you know the holiday season has been with us - and then some of us old chaps are getting lazy and slow.

 

Anyhow, I am not able to give you any information relative to the matter of the ‘wholesale changes of names’ among some of the old timers. I talked to Wyatt about it and he does not remember such legislation. A bunch of the ‘early birds’ on the frontier were going under assumed names - but you are on a different scent.

 

You see, Wyatt left Tombstone early in 1882, and I left in July or August of the same year and was in Washington, D.C. for nearly two years - so we may have missed this trick in the interest of ‘heirs and assigns.’ Sorry.

 

Well, how goes the battle? What is to be the title of the new book? Sure, we are ‘interested,’ and, more than that - we are anxious. Tell us as much as you dare to at this stage of the game. MORE POWER TO YOU.

 

Very truly yours,

John P. Clum

 

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January 24, 1929

Mr. Stuart N. Lake

San Diego, California.

 

Dear Mr. Lake:

 

Mrs. Earp has just asked me if I had given you the details of the attack made on me in an attempted cowardly assasination [sic] under cover of the night by the Clanton-McLowery clan on December 14, 1881. I don’t think I have. I was the first intended victim. Two weeks later they made their mid-night attack on Virgil Earp, and about two months later they assasinated [sic] Morgan Earp at Mid-night. If you care for these details I will be glad to furnish them. I also have newspaper clippings covering this episode.

 

When you were here for the funeral you said you would write me a letter. No letter has reached me. Hope to see the new book soon.

 

Very truly yours,

John P. Clum

 

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January 29, 1929

 

Dear Mr. Lake:

 

Complying with your request of the 25th instant I am enclosing copies of telegram and statements published in the Tombstone Epitaph, Tucson Star and Tucson Citizen at the time I was shot out of the coach while en route from Tombstone to Benson on the night of Dec. 14, 1881.

 

This story has been buried so long that I think, as you do, that it will be ‘of uncommon interest’ in your story. It is so long since I have read the stuff over that I am surprised at the many important details therein set forth.

 

I am sending you the copies to-day in order that you may know it is my purpose to give you the complete story. I will write up the main facts and all that happened on the eventful night of Dec. 16, 1881, and will call attention to the important items of evidence.

 

I supposed Wyatt had given you the story, but, as I have said, it has been buried so long that I guess even Wyatt had forgotten it. These clippings have been in one of my old scrap-books so long that I don’t want to take them out and chance loosing [sic] them, but you are welcome to have a look at them at any time.

 

I have a photograph of the Epitaph of Dec. 16, 1881, in which the story of ‘A DARK DEED’ shows up all right. In fact I made the copy from the photograph - using a strong glass. I will send you the photo and you may have a copy made if you care to. I think it would show up all right in your story - but you would be shot if you did not return said photo. Mebbee [sic] will send the photo to-morrow. Please pardon the bum typewriting in the copies.

 

Very truly yours,

John P. Clum

 

p.s., Neither Burns nor Breckenridge has any mention of this thrilling story of the attack on the stage. It is so old it will be new - even to the old-timers.

 

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March 27, 1929

 

Mr. Stuart N. Lake

San Diego, California

 

My dear Mr. Lake:

 

Yes, I can appreciate that you have been busy as I have been doing some research work myself in which it was important that the job should stand the acid test of ‘checking and rechecking.’

 

I regret to tell you that my old scrap-book holds nothing relative to the MID-NIGHT ASSASSINS excepting the articles of which I have already furnished you copies. A couple of valuable scrap-books were burned when my postoffice was dynamited at the time of the second big fire at Tombstone. However, I would be very glad to have you drop in at this shack and look over the three scrap-books I have. There is quite a bit of old Tombstone stuff-and you are welcome to anything they contain that you may think would add to the integrity and interest of your book.

 

The court records should give you all of the evidence in the trial of the Earp boys and Doc. Holiday, as well as the Behan indictment.

 

‘Billy’ Kelly is the present owner and editor of the Epitaph. His grandfather, Major George H. Kelly, is now the State Historian for Arizona and a good friend of mine. I have never met Billy Kelly, but we have had considerable correspondence and I wrote the story of the founding of the Epitaph for him and which he published a year ago next month. Billy’s wife called here about a year ago. She and Billy are bright young people and devoted to TOMBSTONE. They are intensely interested in any proposition that will boost the fame of the old home town, and I am sure they will be greatly interested in your book, and will aid you in any way possible in the matter of obtaining the records and facts you desire. I will be glad to write them of your contemplated visit and to give you a letter of introduction to Billy. I do not know of a single person now living in Tombstone whom I knew when I was a resident there.

 

I have a letter from Mrs. Earp in which she says she will visit Los Angeles in April, and we shall be glad to see her again. We were grateful for the opportunity to be of some service to her in her bereavement.

 

With kind personal regards, I am

 

Sincerely yours,

John P. Clum

 

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October 5, 1929

 

Dear Mr. Lake:

 

Your reference to the ‘Forrestine Hooker manuscript on Wyatt’ is absolutely the first I ever heard of such a production, - therefore it is obvious I do not know anything about the ‘row’ that busted up the combination.

 

How is the book developing?

 

It is probable that I will go to Tombstone for the SEMI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION the latter part of this month.

 

Sincerely yours,

John P. Clum

 

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July 31, 1930

 

Mr. Fred J. Dodge

Boerne, Texas

 

Dear Fred:

 

It was very good of Stuart Lake to give you my address - and then it is mighty fine in you to write me a letter. I happened to locate in Los Angeles just in time to visit Wyatt Earp frequently during the last months of his life. I saw him the night before he died - and was a pall-bearer at his funeral. Yesterday I sent you a copy of my story of the happenings in Tombstone during the latter part of 1881 and the first part of 1882. They held a celebration in Tombstone last October which was called ‘Helldorado’ - which I attended, and I am handing you herewith a little story I wrote after that celebration.

 

Wyatt and I talked of you several times, but I got the impression that you were living somewhere near old Fort Dodge. During 1891 and 1892 I was in Texas for the Postoffice Department; had headquarters at Austin and San Antonio, and my field was the Western Judicial District of Texas 68 counties - extending south to Brownsville and west to El Paso. Now tell me just where are you located? I am glad you are so well. I will be 79 on September 1st, and you can’t be so much younger. I still drive a DODGE about the country - but I doubt if I would dare to tackle a trip of 6,000 miles. I was down in Arizona again last March at the dedication of the Coolidge Dam. During the past three years I have been writing some stories for the state magazines of New Mexico and Arizona. These stories are all about the Apache Indians excepting the one I sent you yesterday about Tombstone and the brochure I am enclosing telling all about the HELLDORADO celebration. If you survive these two narratives please tell me so and I will write you again - but there are mighty few now living who were with us at Tombstone in the early 80s.

 

Sincerely yours

John P. Clum

 

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Dodge to Clum, 9/24/1930

 

Dodge Ranch, Boerne, Texas. Sept. 24, 1930

Mr. John P. Clum

1959 West 74 St.

Los Angeles, Cal.

 

Dear John:

 

Your much appreciated letter and the accompanying ARIZONA HISTORICAL REVIEW, and HELLDORADO, and the clippings reached me some six weeks ago. August was a strenuous month with us, and complicated by illness in my family, and by getting the son and heir off to his school. Now things have settled back to normalcy, and I write to tell you how much I enjoyed hearing from you, and learning that you are still hale and active. Your picture show you still well fed, and your printed work shows that you have lost none of your old time vigor and pith.

 

I have read carefully and with much interest your ‘it all happened in Tombstone.’ It is a well remembered history and sets forth the facts just as they were. In this article I note that you have been quite generous in your reference to Johnny Behan. One knows, who can read between the lines that there has been much left unsaid. With reference to the Stillwell that Wyatt killed at Tucson; my recollection was that it was Frank. Didn’t Jack come on the scene later than that?

 

At the time of the celebration in Tombstone I felt considerable regret that I could not be present. But after reading your account I was glad I was not there. Aside from meeting a few old friends, and chiefly yourself, it would have been on [sic] pleasure. We old timers know that the battles fouhjt [sic] for law and order in Tombstone were no moving picture affairs. Good men, who were our friends, met wounds and death there. It is an offense to us and to them to reproduce these things as an entertaining spectacle, an incident, for it is not possible to show what necessity lay back of them and made them inevitable.

 

With pleasure and satisfaction I read your paragraph 2 page 9 in your review of ‘Helldorado.’

 

I am returning herewith the clippings from the Evening Herald. Thanks for letting me read them. It is good to have new [sic] of old friends. Though I knew you had done much work among the Apaches I did not know how far reaching that work had been, and am glad to be able to keep the page from the Arizona Republican.

 

During the years that we were together in Tombstone you, nor any one else, knew that I was under cover man for Wells Fargo, reporting directly to the President, Mr. Valentine. In the following years I learned in this capacity, many things that had been unknown to us about the lawless element. I remained in the employment of the Company as Special Agent until the time of my retirement. For the last ten years I have lived on my Ranch thirty five miles north west of San Antonio, and eight miles from Boerne which is on the Old Spanish Trail, thirty one miles north of San Antonio. My land lies in three Counties, Bexar, Banders, and Kendall. They corner within a half mile of the house.

 

With very kindest regards, and the hope to hear from you again whenever time and inclination permit, I am

 

Sincerely your friend,

 

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September 25, 1930

 

Mr. Fred J. Dodge

Boerne, Texas

 

My dear Fred:

 

Just now I am trying to write something as a tribute to the memory of Nellie Cashman. I first met Nellie in Tucson in 1879. Then, of course, she was in Tombstone. I met her at Dawson on the Yukon in 1898, and saw her for the last time at Fairbanks, Alaska, in 1908. I should have made some notes of Nellie’s doings during those years - but I didn’t. Now I am trying to dig up details of definite incidents in her life. I hope you can recall some particular episode in which Nellie was the star actor. What do you remember regarding that stampede she joined with Joyce and others into Lower California in 1884?? Please think hard and tell me all you can remember of special interest regarding Nellie Cashman. She died in Victoria, B.C., five years ago.

 

Mrs. Earp, Wyatt’s widow, had dinner with us last evening. She is planning a trip to the east and hopes to see you en route.

 

I hope to have my story of Nellie published in the magazine issued under the direction of the State Historian of Arizona - and thus give this remarkable woman a permanent record in the state archives. I hope to finish this story next month and hope I may have something from you by that time.

 

With all good wishes, I am,

Very sincerely yours,

John P. Clum

 

Hope you have received my letter in reply to yours of July 23d

 

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October 22, 1930

 

My dear Fred:

 

The inclosed clippings appeared in the Los Angeles Times yesterday. I did not attend the celebration this year. Our old friend Billy Monmonier has passed on. Very few of the real old-timers remain. In a few days I will send you a copy of the Official Helldorado Program for this year. It contains a ‘dialog’ which I would like to have you read carefully - and then tell me what you really think of it.

 

Just now I am putting in my spare time on the story of Nellie Cashman - and I thank you again for the valuable data you sent me. Mrs. Earp called me on the phone last evening and announced her return to L.A. She said she had visited with you and would come up here in a day or two and tell us all about her trip. We shall be much interested in hearing what she has to relate.

 

Here’s good luck to you, Fred.

Sibcerely [sic]

John P. Clum

 

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Dodge to Clum, 10/29/1930

 

Dodge Ranch, Boerne, Texas, Oct. 29, 1930

 

Mr. John P. Clum,

1953 West 74th St.

Los Angeles, Cal.

 

Dear John:

 

Before this Mrs. Earp has been to see you, and you have heard what she thinks of Texas and the Dodge Ranch. She was here in the middle of the worst October we have had in years, and had small chance to see how really attractive our part of the country can be, but I enjoyed her brief visit very much. And no part of it more than the first hand news of you.

 

As you probably know she greatly admires both you and Mrs. Clum, and told us all about you and how pleasantly you are situated. She was very tired when she was here and I was glad to learn from your letter that she had arrived safely in Los Angeles. It was sad to see her so worn and troubled, and so alone. Evidently she is inexperienced in handling business matters. I suppose Wyatt attended to everything.

 

She asked my advice and I gave her the best that I had - to go to you and ask your counsel and help, and, if you were willing to undertake it, to give you a power of attorney to represent her in this publication business.

 

So Billy Monmonier has joined the great majority. I knew Billy very very well in the Tombstone days. This narrows the margin of those left by the count of one. You and I must have been made of some extra tough stuff.

 

I will be glad to receive the copy of the Helldorado program. It may be in the post office now, and if so, I will get it tomorrow. We have been kept at home this week by the bad weather. So far this month we have had fifteen inches of rain - an almost unprecedented amount in this country, in such a short time.

 

Mr. Cunningham was a very small boy when I knew of him. I would be highly interested to hear histories of his Aunt Nell, and shall hope to see your article when it is printed. If my paragraph and name can be of use to you in your history making, help yourself. I will be glad to see your story of Chief Es-kim-in-zin. Your first hand knowledge of the Apaches as they were must make some mighty interesting stories.

 

You are certainly fortunate to have your family all about you. I have only one grandson, a lad of eighteen. His mother, by the way, was born in Tombstone, but has no distinct recollection of it as she was less than a year old when we moved away. This daughter and her son, and my twelve year old so, are my only descendants. I note with interest that you will be eighty on your next birthday and congratulate you on your hearty and comfortable advanced age. I am not so far behind you. I was seventy six on the 29th day of last August.

 

Let me hear from you as often as you find time. With hearty good wishes,

 

Sincerely your friend.

 

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Dodge to Clum 12/16/1930

 

Dodge Ranch, Boerne, Texas. Dec. 16, 1930

 

Mr. John P. Clum

1958 West 74th St.

Los Angeles, Cal.

 

Dear John:

 

Fred J. Dodge Jr. managed to pick up a scarlet fever bug somewhere so we have been cut off from communication by letter for some time. That is the reason you have not heard from me. But now we are fumigated and safe for democracy once more so I write to tell you all the things I have been holding back this long time.

 

To commence with, I received the two books giving the story of Es-kim-in-zin. I have often heard of Es-kim-in-zin but this is the first time I have known all the facts about him; so you can judge with what interest I read your story of this remarkable and much abused Indian. Your sympathetic insight and first hand information of Indian wrongs ought to be of great value, financial to you, and educational to others, now that the public sentiment concerning Indians is changing so greatly. It did me good to read your remarks to the train conductor, about what kind of savage Es-kim-in-zin was: That conductor was typical of the great mass of opinion - that all Indians were alike, and all brutal savages. Your closing paragraph is especially beautiful; and I regret with you that you did not have the opportunity of seeing your friend before he passed out.

 

Stuart Lake sent me a copy of Billy Breckenridge’s book ‘Helldorado, eroneously called ‘The true story of Tombstone.’ Billy states some near-truths in this book, but Billy either did not know the whole truth or is protecting his friends. I was amused to note how he emphasizes his courage in going among the outlaws alone, remembering as I do how said outlaws were his and Johnny Behan’s friends and how little they had to fear from him. You know Billy and I know Billy. He was in those days a nice girl, and in his declining years should be a nice old lady, instead of trying to make himself a hero of ‘Helldorado’

 

Did Mrs. Earp show her copy of ‘Saint Johnson’? When she was here she was very much upset by this book. If you have not seen it I will send you my copy. It is not worthy of comment, except as a sample of the trash that is being gotten out and sold on the wave of popular interest in the old west. It would make you, and me, and Wyatt, if he were still here, think that we had never been in Tombstone.

 

I cannot too strongly condemn such stuff as this dialog ‘Helldorado.’ They have tried to give a fiction value and interest by hanging it on to the names of real men, and so have distorted the good men and idealized bad ones in the public mind. It is all wrong.

 

I hope you are succeeding as well as you anticipated in your Nellie Cashman history. Enclosed is a clipping which a friend in Dallas sent to me. If any of the hits from Broadway were played at the Birdcage, I missed them. And if Lottie Crabtree was ever there she slipped in when I wasn’t looking.

 

Well John, old friend, I hope the New Year brings you health, happiness, and prosperity. All good luck to you, and yours.

 

With kindest regards from Mrs. Dodge and myself to you and Mrs. Clum.

 

Sincerely, your friend

 

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December 26, 1930

 

Mr. Fred J. Dodge,

Boerne, Texas

 

My dear Fred:

 

We are much pleased to know that Fred Jr., has dumped that scarlet fever bug into the discard - and for two reasons. In the first place we are quite sure the kid was quite willing to part company with the said BUG, and, secondly, the elimination of the bug made it possible for us to resume correspondence.

 

The fact that you have survived the reading of the story of my old college chum, Es-kim-in-sin proves that you are still in fine condition -physically. Of course, I am greatly pleased if you found the narrative of interest. Many evil statements have been made against the old Arivaipa chieftain by persons who never saw him. I had opportunity to study Es-kim-in-sin for several years. He was a true friend to me when I was much in need of such a friend. I have simply tried to describe him as I knew him - and that’s that.

 

I heartily concur in your estimate of the book, HELLDORADO, - as well as of its author. Poor Billy is now 84 years of age and has only a little time left in which to enjoy his imaginary glory.

 

Yes, Mrs. Earp showed me a copy of ‘Saint Johnson’. As you say, that sort of literature is merely ‘stuff;’ - pure junk, etc., etc. and it is a pity that such historical twaddle is being unloaded upon the present generation when they should have the facts. I have shouted my head off against this style of rip-roaring, Helldorado publicity for poor old Tombstone - and similar way-stations in the line of the development of the old West. But it is no use. The idiots will continue to howl and to broadcast their ‘colorful tales’ FOR CASH. So the best we can do is to get into the records as much of our own stories as possible - and I believe that in the years to come there will be wise men who will examine this record and will separate the wheat from the chaff. That is what I have been trying to do in a modest way during the past three years.

 

The Nellie Cashman biography has developed into a much more satisfactory narrative than I h ad dared to hope for when I undertook the task - thanks to you and three or four other good friends who have so kindly contributed valuable data. The manuscript is now in the hands of the printer and the story is to appear in the January issue of the Arizona Historical Review. You may be sure that I will send you a copy at the earliest moment practicable. I hope you may not be to much disappointed in the story.

 

Under separate cover I am sending you a section of The Washington Star and a clipping from the Los Angeles Times. I have marked the Star section on pages 3 and 21. You read the marked parts and I will tell you about them next time. I have to run down town to see Sol Israel - who is very ill. You will remember Sol. So here is a very Merry Christmas for you and yours and the hope that the new year may be good to all of you. My wife joins heartily in these greetings.

 

Ever sincerely your friend of long ago,

John P. Clum

 

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December 26, 1930

 

Mr. Fred J. Dodge,

Boerne, Texas

 

My dear Fred:

 

We are much pleased to know that Fred Jr., has dumped that scarlet fever bug into the discard - and for two reasons. In the first place we are quite sure the kid was quite willing to part company with the said BUG, and, secondly, the elimination of the bug made it possible for us to resume correspondence.

 

The fact that you have survived the reading of the story of my old college chum, Es-kim-in-sin proves that you are still in fine condition -physically. Of course, I am greatly pleased if you found the narrative of interest. Many evil statements have been made against the old Arivaipa chieftain by persons who never saw him. I had opportunity to study Es-kim-in-sin for several years. He was a true friend to me when I was much in need of such a friend. I have simply tried to describe him as I knew him - and that’s that.

 

I heartily concur in your estimate of the book, HELLDORADO, - as well as of its author. Poor Billy is now 84 years of age and has only a little time left in which to enjoy his imaginary glory.

 

Yes, Mrs. Earp showed me a copy of ‘Saint Johnson’. As you say, that sort of literature is merely ‘stuff;’ - pure junk, etc., etc. and it is a pity that such historical twaddle is being unloaded upon the present generation when they should have the facts. I have shouted my head off against this style of rip-roaring, Helldorado publicity for poor old Tombstone - and similar way-stations in the line of the development of the old West. But it is no use. The idiots will continue to howl and to broadcast their ‘colorful tales’ FOR CASH. So the best we can do is to get into the records as much of our own stories as possible - and I believe that in the years to come there will be wise men who will examine this record and will separate the wheat from the chaff. That is what I have been trying to do in a modest way during the past three years.

 

The Nellie Cashman biography has developed into a much more satisfactory narrative than I h ad dared to hope for when I undertook the task - thanks to you and three or four other good friends who have so kindly contributed valuable data. The manuscript is now in the hands of the printer and the story is to appear in the January issue of the Arizona Historical Review. You may be sure that I will send you a copy at the earliest moment practicable. I hope you may not be to much disappointed in the story.

 

Under separate cover I am sending you a section of The Washington Star and a clipping from the Los Angeles Times. I have marked the Star section on pages 3 and 21. You read the marked parts and I will tell you about them next time. I have to run down town to see Sol Israel - who is very ill. You will remember Sol. So here is a very Merry Christmas for you and yours and the hope that the new year may be good to all of you. My wife joins heartily in these greetings.

 

Ever sincerely your friend of long ago,

John P. Clum

 

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July 31, 1930

 

Mr. Fred J. Dodge

Boerne, Texas

 

Dear Fred:

 

It was very good of Stuart Lake to give you my address - and then it is mighty fine in you to write me a letter. I happened to locate in Los Angeles just in time to visit Wyatt Earp frequently during the last months of his life. I saw him the night before he died - and was a pall-bearer at his funeral. Yesterday I sent you a copy of my story of the happenings in Tombstone during the latter part of 1881 and the first part of 1882. They held a celebration in Tombstone last October which was called ‘Helldorado’ - which I attended, and I am handing you herewith a little story I wrote after that celebration.

 

Wyatt and I talked of you several times, but I got the impression that you were living somewhere near old Fort Dodge. During 1891 and 1892 I was in Texas for the Postoffice Department; had headquarters at Austin and San Antonio, and my field was the Western Judicial District of Texas 68 counties - extending south to Brownsville and west to El Paso. Now tell me just where are you located? I am glad you are so well. I will be 79 on September 1st, and you can’t be so much younger. I still drive a DODGE about the country - but I doubt if I would dare to tackle a trip of 6,000 miles. I was down in Arizona again last March at the dedication of the Coolidge Dam. During the past three years I have been writing some stories for the state magazines of New Mexico and Arizona. These stories are all about the Apache Indians excepting the one I sent you yesterday about Tombstone and the brochure I am enclosing telling all about the HELLDORADO celebration. If you survive these two narratives please tell me so and I will write you again - but there are mighty few now living who were with us at Tombstone in the early 80s.

 

Sincerely yours

John P. Clum

 

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November 9, 1931

 

Mr. Fred J. Dodge,

Boerne, Texas

 

My dear Fred:

 

Yes Fred, I feel as you do - that we should keep in closer communication with each other during the remainder of the days that are left to us. I was glad to have you tell me in your letter of Sept. 11th that in spite of these tough times you have regular meals and are husky and contented. The same here - but we know there are millions who are feeling the pinch seriously.

 

Well Wyatt’s book has arrived. I am very, very glad that you was [sic] spared to be of such assistance to Mr. Lake. Since Wyatt had to leave us I feel that you knew the facts better than any other person living. I think it is the best story of the old West that has been published. I feel sure that Wyatt would like it. The papers have given many fine write-ups. I believe it will have a big sale and will grow in popularity.

 

Herewith are some of the reckless tales that have been in the public press recently - either by me or about me - , and I send them for whatever they may be worth.

 

Mrs. Earp was here yesterday and was feeling quite pleased with the friendly reception that has been given Wyatt’s book. Her health is fair - although she has permitted herself to worry a lot about the book.

 

Of course, you know they had another ‘Helldorado’ at Tombstone this year, but the old camp is in a very bad way - made much worse by the loss of the county seat, and, later, the failure of the bank.

 

I wish The Dodge Ranch was not so far from Gramercy and 74th. I would very much like to wind up our old Dodge and roll over to your ranch and straddle one of your worst broncos. No?????? Oh yes. Mrs. Earp told me she had a fine letter from Mrs. Dodge.

 

Well, Fred, I hope this finds you still stout and hearty. Write to me and tell me all about it. I have talked so much about you in connection with the preparation of Wyatt’s book that my wife feel [sic] quite well acquainted with you - and admires you almost as much as I do. But Mrs. Dodge must not be jealous. Anyhow, Mrs. Clum joins me in cordial personal regards to yourself and family.

 

Ever sincerely yours,

John P. Clum

 

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